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Projects and Contacts for
North American Breeding Bird Atlas Contacts

Part 1: A - M
AK | AL| AR | AZ | CA | CO | CT | DC | DE | FL | GA | IA | IL | IN | KS | KY | LS | MA | MD | ME | MI | MO | MS | Part 2: N-W and Canada
Other Avian Distribution Projects

Last updated March 2006
Send corrections or updates to
Mike Cadman, NORAC Chair

NORAC Directory of Atlas Contacts

UNITED STATES
 

ALABAMA

First Atlas: 2002-2006
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations:
Alabama Ornithological Society
Project Web site: http://www.bham.net/aos/bba/index.htm

Contact:

Summary of goals:

  • To accurately determine and map the geographic distribution of every bird species breeding in Alabama;
  • To provide a 12% sample of reliably studied areas useful for statistical projections and as a baseline against which future changes in the status of breeding birds in Alabama can be measured;
  • To provide some index of relative abundance of Alabama’s breeding birds, especially in understudied areas;
  • To provide additional information on breeding chronology, nesting, and habitat requirements for Alabama’s breeding birds;
  • To provide a reliable data base useful for writing a state bird book, and for making sound natural resource use decisions in Alabama;
  • To involve birders, students, land owners, and interested citizens in a directed, cooperative, educational and fascinating research project;
  • To work with land owners and land stewards so as to respect property rights and serve as ambassadors to the community at large;
  • To see the project through to timely publication;
  • To accomplish these objectives in an economical way so as not to unduly draw funds and manpower from other valuable conservation initiatives.

Abundance data collected: Yes - inadvertently.

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Some quantitative data are being collected as a loose adjunct of the program. This consists of 0500 to 1100 counts on non-random routes within an Atlas Block (1/6 of a USGS 7.5 minute quadrangle) of slightly larger than 10 sq miles (25 sq Km). These results will probably be published separately. Some results have been published in a preliminary form of birds per party hour in ALABAMA BIRDS, by G. D. Jackson.

ALASKA - Fort Richardson Army base

First Atlas: 1996-1997
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Brina Kessel and Dan Gibson
    University of Alaska Museum
    907 Yukon Drive, Fairbanks, AK 99775 USA
    (907) 474-7359
  • Brad Andres
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-Migratory Bird Management
    1011 East Tudor, Road
    Anchorage, AK 99503 USA
    (907) 786-3444

No atlas in progress or planned in the near future.

ARIZONA

First Atlas: 1993-1999
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations:
The Arizona Game and Fish Department. Funders: The Arizona Game and Fish Department’s Heritage Fund (lottery dollars); Partnerships for Wildlife Grants; Bureau of Land Management; Wildlife Conservation Restoration Program; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; U.S. Forest Service; The Nature Conservancy; and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

Summary of goals:

  • To determine the breeding distribution of Arizona’s nesting bird species at the end of the twentieth century.

Abundance data collected: Yes.

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Relative abundance for each breeding species was only roughly estimated for each priority block (25 square km/10 sq. miles). For each species, surveyors were to estimate the number of breeding pairs on their atlas block by designating one of five categories:

  • 1 breeding pair on block
  • 2-10 breeding pairs on block
  • 11-100 breeding pairs on block
  • 101-1000 breeding pairs on block
  • >1000 breeding pairs on block

Available Reference: Corman, Tory and C. Wise-Gervais. 2005. Arizona Breeding Bird Atlas. University of New Mexico Press.

ARKANSAS

First Atlas: 1994-unknown
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations:
Initial funding of the project came from the Arkansas Game and fish commission, the University of Arkansas, and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation in Washington, D.C.
Project Web site: http://www.uark.edu/misc/kgsmith/abba.html

Contact:

  • Kimberley G. Smith
    Department of Biological Sciences, 601 Science Engineering,
    University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701
    (479) 575-6359

Summary of goals: Developing a series of distributional maps for all species of birds that breed within the state.

Abundance data collected: No

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable

CALIFORNIA

Contra Costa County, CA

First Atlas: 1998-2002
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: http://www.flyingemu.com/ccosta/

Contact:

Available Reference: Glover, S and J. Herr. 2003. Contra Costa County Breeding Bird Atlas. http://www.flyingemu.com/ccosta/ (date accessed)

Humboldt County, CA

First Atlas: 1995-2000
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations: Redwood Region Audubon Society, with co-sponsorship by Six Rivers National Forest.
Project Web site: http://www.northcoast.com/~rras/atlas.htm

Contact:

Summary of goals:

  • To map a snapshot of the breeding distribution (a baseline) of the breeding birds of Humboldt County;
  • To assist land managers, biologists, students, birders, and anyone else with a need for such information;
  • Describing habitat associations of breeding birds;
  • Summarizing the historical information;
  • Raising conservation concerns;
  • Providing breeding chronology information;
  • Providing an official list of Humboldt's breeding birds;
  • Compiling a bibliography of local breeding bird literature;
  • Improving local birder skills, and to have fun.

Abundance data collected: No, but the project used general abundance terms like common, rare and very rare when describing abundance. They borrowed the abundance terminology from Northwestern California Birds (Harris 1996) for comparability and consistency.

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable.

Available Reference: Hunter, J.E., D. Fix, G.A. Schmidt, and J.C. Power. 2005. Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Humboldt County, California. Redwood Region Audubon Society.

Los Angeles County, CA

First Atlas: 1995-1999
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations: Los Angeles Audubon Society in cooperation with the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the following Audubon Society Chapters: El Dorado, Palos Verdes/South Bay, Pasadena, Pomona Valley, San Fernando Valley, Santa Monica Bay, and Whittier.
Project Web site: http://web.archive.org/web/20021129153004/ http://www.lam.mus.ca.us/~lacbba/

Contact:

Summary of goals:

  • To publish an atlas containing distribution maps as well as detailed accounts for each species.

Abundance data collected: Yes

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: unknown

Marin County, CA

First Atlas: 1976-1982
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisation:
Point Reyes Bird Observatory-now PRBO Conservation Science.
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • David Shuford
    Point Reyes Bird Observatory Conservation Science
    4990 Shoreline Highway, Stinson Beach, CA 94970
    (415) 868-0371 Ext 310 • fax (415) 868-8962

Summary of goals: to document the distribution and broadscale habitat use of all birds in the area and to summarize that info in a form in which it would be useful to conservation.

Abundance data collected: No

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable

Available Reference: Shuford, W.D. 1993. The Marin County Breeding Bird Atlas: a Distributional and Natural History of Coastal California Birds. Bolinas, CA: Bushtit Books.

Monterey County, CA

First Atlas: 1988-1992
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations:
Monterey Peninsula Audubon Society; publication support by Ilkhorn Slough Foundation and Monterey County Fish & Game Propagation Fund.
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

Summary of goals:

  • To outline the breeding distribution and gross abundance of the breeding birds of Monterey County on a grid-based atlas;
  • To collect generalized information about breeding phenology.

Abundance data collected: Yes

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Abundance estimates were based on very rough population estimates using an exponential scale of 1 pair only, 2-10, 11-100, or 101-1000 pairs.

Available Reference: Roberson, D. and C. Tenney, (Eds.). 1993. Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Monterey County California. Pacific Grove, CA: Monterey Peninsula Audubon.

Napa County, CA

First Atlas: 1989-1993
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations:
Napa-Solano Audubon Society. Funding from: about 50 private individuals; 3 local Audubon chapters; the Christian Brothers Justin Community; Napa County Wildlife Conservation Commission; Bird-a-thon and silent auction fundraising; and a major grant from the Giles M. and Elise G. Mead Foundation.
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Robin Leong
    336 Benson Avenue
    Vallejo, CA 94590-3027
    (707) 643-1287

Summary of goals:

  • Determine the breeding distribution of all bird species in the county;
  • Better understand the phenology of breeding birds;
  • Create interest among local birders;
  • Identify sites of species richness, populations of species of special concern, and suggest priorities for conservation strategies of species and habitats;
  • Create a baseline of data for future reference.

Abundance data collected: Yes

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Atlassers are simply asked to estimate the number of pairs in their block on a standard 1-5 scale:
1 pair: abundance code 1
2-10 pairs: abundance code 2
11-100 pairs: abundance code 3
101-1,000: abundance code 4
1001-10,000 pairs: abundance code 5

Atlassers arrive at the number by judging the number of pairs present in a given habitat of a given area, and extrapolating those figures to include the entire block. Atlassers were told to leave the abundance estimate blank unless they were comfortable in their understanding of the concept.

Available Reference: Smith, A. (Ed). Breeding Birds of Napa County, California. 2003. Napa-Solano Audubon Society.

Orange County, CA

First Atlas: unknown
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Sylvia Gallagher
    (714) 962-8990

Available Reference: Gallagher, S. R. 1997. Atlas of breeding birds, Orange County, California. Irvine: Sea and Sage Audubon Press.

Riverside County, CA

First Atlas: 1990-2000
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Barbara A. Carlson
    Matte Rimrock Reserve, Biology Dept - University of CA,
    Riverside, CA 92521
    (951) 369-3179

Sacramento County, CA

First Atlas: unknown
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Tim Manolis
    (916) 485-9009

San Bernardino County, CA

First Atlas: 1987-1992
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Barbara A. Carlson
    Matte Rimrock Reserve, Biology Dept - University of CA,
    Riverside, CA 92521
    (951) 369-3179

San Diego County, CA

First Atlas:
1997-2002
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations:
The California Department of Fish and Game; California Department of Transportation; California State Parks; National Fish and Wildlife Foundation; Palomar Audubon Society; San Diego Audubon Society; San Diego County Water Authority; San Diego Unified Port District; Sweetwater Authority; U.S. Forest Service; U.S. Navy; Zoological Society of San Diego; and 160 individuals, societies, and companies.
Project Web site: http://www.sdnhm.org/research/birdatlas/index.html

Contact:

  • Phil Unitt
    Collection Manager, Department of Birds and Mammals
    San Diego Natural History Museum
    P.O. Box 121390
    San Diego, CA 92112-1390
    Phone: (619) 255-0235 Fax: (619) 232-0248

Summary of goals:

  • To create a powerful tool in assessing and guiding the conservation of wildlife;
  • To document breeding species and distribution.

Abundance data collected: Yes

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Observers counted or estimated numbers. If the species is flocking or localized, such as waterfowl, the highest number reported on any field trip to each atlas square was used. The counts were then grouped in up to three categories and are shown on maps in 3 shades of blue: >

  • Light for maximum daily count 1-10;
  • Medium for maximum daily count 11-25;
  • Dark for maximum daily count 25-50.

If the species is more evenly distributed through its habitat, such as many chaparral birds, the sum-total of each species reported by square, divided by the number of hours reported by observers covering that square, then grouped the quotients in up to three categories:

  • No hatching (i.e. open square on map) for fewer than 1.00 birds per hour;
  • Single hatching (i.e. divided square on map) for 1.00-2.50 birds per hour;
  • Double (cross) hatching for 2.50-6.84 birds per hour.

Available Reference: Unitt, P. 2004. San Diego County Bird Atlas. Vista, CA: Ibis Publ.

San Francisco County, CA

First Atlas: 1991-1993
Second Atlas: n/a
Sponsoring Organisation: San Francisco Field Ornithologists
Project Web site: http://www.sffo.org/Breeding%20Ecology/ San%20Francisco%20Breeding%20Bird%20Atlas.pdf

Contact:

Summary of goals:

  • Creation of a conservation tool;
  • A documentation of breeding species and their distribution.

Abundance data collected: Yes

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: unknown

Available Reference: Singer, D. and M.W. Eaton (EDs.). 2003. (Draft) San Francisco Breeding Bird Atlas. San Francisco Field Ornithologists. <http://www.sffo.org/Breeding%20Ecology/San%20 Francisco%20Breeding%20Bird%20Atlas.pdf>

San Luis Obispo County, CA

First Atlas: unknown
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Tim Edell
    (805) 995-1691

San Mateo Counties, CA

First Atlas: 1991-1995
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Rick Johnson
    108 Walter Hays Dr.,
    Palo Alto, CA 94303
    415-329-9639

Santa Clara County, CA

First Atlas: 1988-1993
Second Atlas: n/a
Sponsoring Organisation:
None
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Bill Bousman
    321 Arlington Way,
    Menlo Park, CA 94025
    415-322-5282

Summary of goals:

  • Use replicable survey techniques to do a systematic statewide survey, in appropriate seasons, for evidence of breeding by all bird species.
  • Document the current abundance, distribution, and nesting patterns of the state's/county's breeding birds.
  • Use data collected to create a series of statewide maps by township and quarter township (atlas block) showing breeding occurrence and distribution for each species.
  • Document nesting occurrences, habitats, and status of rare, threatened, endangered, and special concern bird species for use in conservation planning and land-use decisions.
  • Provide current data for use by private industry and government agencies in preparing environmental assessments and impact statements and for use in making conservation management decisions.
  • Provide information for comparison with with earlier studies, and with future studies to document changes in the state's breeding bird populations.
  • Increase expertise and involvement of the state's/county's birders in scientific research.
  • Strengthen bonds among Organisations in the state's/county's concerned with birds and their habitats.
  • Educate the state's/county's citizens about birds and increase public awareness and participation in birding and citizen science programs.

Abundance data collected: Yes

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: We used the abundance codes that were suggested at the time (1987).  In addition, we encouraged, but did not require, atlasers to provide additional confirmations beyond the nominal 1/block.  Thus, the total number of confirmations represents an abundance measure.  I'll go a bit into this in the results section, which I'll be writing in a few weeks.  There is an r^2 = 0.61 between the two measures.

The codes were:

  • 1: 1 pair
  • 2: 2-10 pairs
  • 3: 11-100 pairs
  • 4: 101-1,000 pairs
  • 5: 1,001+ pairs

Santa Cruz County, CA

First Atlas: 1987-1993
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • David Suddjian
    801 Monterey Ave.,
    Capitola, CA 95010
    (831) 479-9603 • fax( 831) 479-3246

Solano County, CA

First Atlas: 2004-2009
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: http://www.napasolanoaudubon.com/atlas.htm

Contact:

  • Robin Leong
    336 Benson Avenue
    Vallejo, CA 94590-3027
    (707) 643-1287

Sonoma County, CA

First Atlas: 1986-1991
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring organisations:
Napa-Solano Audubon Society. Funding from: US Fish and Wildlife Service; US Navy; Travis AFB; California Department of Fish and Game; a cross-section of Solano County parks and recreation districts and public works; Solano Land Trust; Ducks Unlimited; and University of California, Davis.
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Betty Burridge
    1653 Arroyo Sierra Way,
    Santa Rosa, CA 95405
    (707) 527-0225

Summary of goals:

  • Determine the breeding distribution of all bird species in the county;
  • Better understand the phenology of breeding birds;
  • Create interest among local birders;
  • Identify sites of species richness, populations of species of special concern, and suggest priorities for conservation strategies of species and habitats;
  • Create a baseline of data for future reference.

Abundance data collected: Yes

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Atlassers are simply asked to estimate the number of pairs in their block on a standard 1-5 scale:
1 pair: abundance code 1
2-10 pairs: abundance code 2
11-100 pairs: abundance code 3
101-1,000 pair: abundance code 4
1001-10,000 pairs: abundance code 5

Atlassers arrive at the number by judging the number of pairs present in a given habitat of a given area, and extrapolating those figures to include the entire block. Atlassers were told to leave the abundance estimate blank unless they were comfortable in their understanding of the concept.

Available Reference: Burridge, B. (Ed.). 1995. Sonoma County Breeding Bird Atlas.  Santa Rosa: Madrone Audubon Soc.

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COLORADO

First Atlas: 1987-1994
Second Atlas:
projected to start in 2007
Sponsoring Organisations: BBA1: Colorado Bird Atlas Partnership ran the project with the cooperation of several dozen federal, state, local, and non-profit Organisations.
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Tony Leukering
    Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory
    14500 Lark Bunting Land
    Brighton CO 80601
    (303) 659-4348
  • David Klute
    Coloado Division of Wildlife
    6060 Broadway
    Denver CO 80216
    303) 291-7320

Summary of goals: Not made available

Abundance data collected: Yes

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Observer estimates using a Logarithmic progression

Available Reference: Kingery, H. 1998. Colorado Breeding Bird Atlas. Denver: Colorado Bird Atlas Partnership.

CONNECTICUT

First Atlas: 1982-1986
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Stacey Kingsbury
    Natural Resources Center, Dept of Environmental Protection
    79 Elm St., Store Level,
    Hartford, CT 06106-5127
    (860) 424-3584 or (860) 424-3540 • fax (860) 424-4058

Available Reference: L.R. Bevier (Ed.). 1994. The Atlas of breeding birds of Connecticut. State Geol. Nat. Hist. Surv. Connecticut Bull. no. 113.

DELAWARE

First Atlas: 1983-1987
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Richard West

Available Reference: Hess, G.K., R.L. West, M.V. Barnhill III, and L.M. Fleming. 2000. Birds of Delaware. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

FLORIDA

First Atlas: 1986-1991
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations:
The Florida Ornithological Society; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; the Price-Campbell Foundation.
Project Web site: http://www.wildflorida.org/bba/  &
http://www.fosbirds.org/atlasdata/BBAFrameset.html

Contact:

  • Bill Pranty
    Avian Ecology Lab
    Archbold Biological Station, 123 Main Drive
    Venus , Florida 33960
    w (863)-465-2571 or h (863) 452-0466

Summary of goals:

  • To map the distribution of the state's birds.

Abundance data collected: No.

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable.

Available Reference: Kale, H.W., II, B.S. Pranty, B.S. Stith, and W.S. Biggs. 1992. An atlas of Florida's breeding birds. Final report. Tallahassee: Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.

GEORGIA

First Atlas: 1994-2001
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring organisations: The Georgia Ornithological Society; the Atlanta Audubon Society; National Fish and Wildlife Foundation; and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division.
Project Web site: http://web.archive.org/web/20021229045440/http://www.gos.org/bba.html

Contact:

  • Todd Schneider
    Georgia Breeding Bird Atlas Project, ANAR,
    Wildlife Resources Division, Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program,
    116 Rum Creek Drive,
    Forsyth GA 31029
    912-994-1438 • fax (478) 993-3050

Summary of goals: To determine the distribution of the breeding birds in Georgia and publish the results, with the following objectives:

  • Survey the state of Georgia systematically for evidence of breeding during the appropriate seasons for all bird species using survey techniques that can be duplicated in the future;
  • Organize data from breeding observations into a series of maps that show the breeding occurrence and distribution of each species within the state;
  • Classify and map the breeding evidence for each species using a set of codes based upon observable criteria for territorial, breeding, nesting, and rearing behaviours;
  • Learn more about the distribution and nesting chronology of Georgia's breeding birds;
  • Provide accurate information on the nesting occurrences, habitats, and status of rare bird species so that their conservation needs can be addressed adequately in future land-use decisions;
  • Identify unique habitats or assemblages of bird species that may warrant focused conservation efforts and evaluate the relative ability of existing managed areas to maintain biological diversity and integrity;
  • Provide data to serve as a baseline against which future changes in status of breeding birds in Georgia can be measured;
  • Introduce Georgia's birders to a new and exciting way of birding, which at the same time contributes valuable information to the state's largest-ever ornithological endeavour.

Abundance data collected: No.

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable.

Haralason County, GA

First Atlas: unknown
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Michael K. Bell

Available Reference: Bell, M.K. 2004. The Breeding Birds of Haralason County.

ILLINOIS

First Atlas: 1986-1991
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations:
Illinois Department of Natural Resources, Illinois Audubon Society and its Chapters, National Audubon Chapters in Illinois, Illinois Ornithological Clubs and Birding Groups
Project Web Site: n/a

Contact:

  • Vernon Kleen

Summary of goals: The goal of the Illinois (first, and thus far, only) Atlas was to  conduct a comprehensive and systematic statewide survey of breeding birds to document their distribution and status in the state.  For further information, page 1 of the Illinois publication will be most useful.

Abundance data collected: No, but see methodology

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: We did not collect abundance data for the project; however, we did incorporate the BBS data (including trends) from 1966 through 2000 in our publication.

Available Reference: Kleen, V.M., L. Cordle, and R.A. Montgomery. 2004. The Illinois Breeding Bird Atlas. Illinois Natural History Survey, Special Publication No. 26.

INDIANA

First Atlas: 1985-1990
Second Atlas:
2005-2010
Sponsoring Organisations: The Indiana Department of Natural Resources; the Indiana Audubon Society; and the Indiana Academy of Science.
Project Web site: http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bba/index.cfm?fa=explore.ProjectHome& BBA_ID=IN2005#historic

Contact:

  • John Castrale
    Avian Ecologist, Indiana Division of Fish & Wildlife,
    RR 2, Box 477,
    Mitchell, IN 47446
    (812) 849-4586

Summary of goals:

  • To produce accurate and current distribution maps for breeding species in Indiana.

Abundance data collected: No. The project did summarize Breeding Bird Survey and Summer Bird Count data by regions in the state.

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable

Available Reference: Castrale, J.S., E.M. Hopkins, and C. E. Keller (Eds.). 1998. Atlas of breeding birds of Indiana. Indianapolis: Indiana Dep. of Nat. Res.

IOWA

First Atlas: 1986-1990
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations: The Iowa Department of Natural Resources and the Iowa Ornithologists' Union.
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

Summary of goals:

  • To provide a summary of current distribution of breeding species in Iowa.

Abundance data collected: No

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable.

Available Reference: Jackson, L.S., C.A. Thompson, and J.J. Dinsmore. 1996. The Iowa Breeding Bird Atlas. Iowa City: Univ. of Iowa Press.

KANSAS

First Atlas: 1992-1997
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations: Long list headed by Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, Kansas Biological Survey, Kansas State University, Kansas Ornithological Society, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Project Web site: http://www.ksbirds.org/kos/kos_kbbat.html

Contact:

  • Bill Burby
    Kansas Biological Survey,
    2101 Constant Avenue
    Laurence KS 66047
    (785) 864-1530

Summary of goals: Document the breeding birds of the state with an emphasis on delineating breeding distribution.

Abundance data collected: No

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable.

Available Reference: Busby, W.H. and J.L. Zimmerman. 2001. Kansas Breeding Bird Atlas. University Press of Kansas.

KENTUCKY

First Atlas: 1985-1991
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations: Kentucky Ornithological Society; the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources; and the Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission.
Project Web site: http://fw.ky.gov/navigation.asp?cid=267

Contact:

Summary of goals:

  • Provide up-to-date distribution maps for every species known to nest in the state;
  • Provide comparative data against which changes in range and status of breeding birds can be identified;
  • Involve birders, other interested individuals, landowners, and groups in a directed cooperative research and educational effort.

Abundance data collected: Yes.

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: A very gross qualitative assessment based on a value of 1 being “only one or one pair observed” to 5 being “one of the most common species in the block”. This data was guesstimated by observers upon completion of their field work.

Available Reference: Palmer-Ball, B., Jr. 1996. The Kentucky Breeding Bird Atlas.  Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

LOUISIANA

First Atlas: 1994-1996
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations: The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation; USGS Gap Analysis Program; Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program; U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service; National Resources Conservation Service. Funding: Canon U.S.A., Inc. and the Louisiana Sea Grant Program.
Project Web site: http://www.manybirds.com/atlas/atlas.htm

Contact:

  • Malcolm Mark Swan
    The Nature Conservancy - Central U.S. Region, 
    711 Navarro Suite 410, San Antonio TX, 78205
    (210) 224-8774 ext. 234

Summary of goals:

  • To develop maps for the public's understanding of the general distribution of each Louisiana breeding species;
  • To be combined (by the USGS Gap Analysis Program) with maps of the general habitat of each species into refined models of their distributions.

Abundance data collected: No

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable.

Available Reference: D. A. Wiedenfeld and M. M. Swan 2000. Louisiana breeding bird atlas. Baton Rouge: Louisiana Sea Grant College Program, Louisiana State Univ.

MAINE

First Atlas: 1978-1983
Second Atlas:
n/a
Project Web site:
n/a

Contact:

Available Reference: Adamus, P. R. 1987. Atlas of breeding birds in Maine, 1978–1983. Augusta: Maine Dept. Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

MARYLAND AND WASHINGTON D.C.

First Atlas: 1983-1987
Second Atlas: 2002-2006
Sponsoring Organisation:
Maryland Ornithological Society.
Project Web site: http://www.mdbirds.org/atlas.html

Contact:

OF NOTE: Data processing will be handled by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, as a pilot project for developing a national standard for computerizing atlas data.

Summary of goals:

  • Provide up-to-date distribution maps for every species known to nest in Maryland or the District of Columbia;
  • Provide comparative data against which changes in range and status of breeding birds can be identified;
  • Make comparisons to the previous Atlas Project;
  • Provide a database that will help environmental planners make informed decisions regarding resource use in Maryland and DC;
  • Provide information on distribution of birds with minimum area requirements;
  • Provide data for use in environmental impact statements and ecological risk assessments;
  • Involve birders, other interested individuals, landowners, and groups in a directed cooperative research and educational effort;
  • Provide research opportunities.

Abundance data collected: No

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable

Available Reference: Robbins, C.S. and E. A. T. Blom (Eds.). 1996. Atlas of Breeding Birds of Maryland and the District of Columbia. Pittsburgh: Univ. of Pittsburgh Press.

Montgomery and Howard County, MD

First Atlas: Unknown
Second Atlas: n/a
Project Web site: n/a

Available Reference: Klimkiewicz, M.K. and J.K. Solem. 1978. The breeding bird atlas of Montgomery and Howard counties, Maryland. Maryland Birdlife 34:3-39.

MASSACHUSETTS


First Atlas: 1974-1979
Second Atlas: 2007 projected start
Sponsoring Organisations: Massachusetts Audubon Society; the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife; and Massachusetts GIS (a branch of Massachusetts Wildlife) helped upgrade maps later on.
Project Web site: n/a

Contact:

  • Wayne R. Petersen (First Atlas)
    Massachusetts Important Bird Areas (IBA) Program
    Cape Cod Bird Conservation Center at Long Pasture
    PO Box 235
    Cummaquid, MA 02367
    (508) 362-1426
  • Joan Walsh (Second Atlas)

Summary of goals:

  • To map the breeding distribution of every species of breeding bird in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
  • To establish a baseline of information about the breeding distribution of birds in the state, against which future atlas efforts could be measured.

Abundance data collected: No

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable

Available Reference: Petersen, W.R. and W.R. Meservey (Eds.). 2003. Massachusetts Breeding Bird Atlas. University of Massachusetts Press.

MICHIGAN

First Atlas: 1983-1988
Second Atlas:
2002-2007
Sponsoring Organsations: Kalamazoo Nature Centre; Funders: Michigan DNR; Michigan Department of Natural Resources Nongame Wildlife Fund; Michigan Audubon Society; Rouge River Bird Observatory; US Fish and Wildlife Service Department of the Interior.
Project Web site: http://www.michiganbirds.org/bba/

Contact:

  • Raymond J. Adams
    Kalamazoo Nature Center,
    7000 North Westnedge Avenue,
    Kalamazoo, MI 49007
    (269) 381-9738 • Fax:(269) 381-1228

Summary of goals:

  • Use replicable survey techniques to do a systematic state-wide survey, in appropriate seasons, for evidence of breeding by all bird species;
  • Document the current abundance, distribution, and nesting patterns of Michigan’s breeding birds;
  • Use data collected to create a series of state-wide maps by township and quarter township (atlas block) showing breeding occurrence and distribution for each species;
  • Document nesting occurrences, habitats, and status of rare, threatened, endangered, and special concern bird species for use in conservation planning and land-use decisions;
  • Identify Michigan’s Important Bird Areas, those sites that are critical to the conservation of the state’s birds;
  • Provide current data for use by private industry and government agencies in preparing environmental assessments and impact statements and for use in making conservation management decisions;
  • Provide information for comparison with the original Michigan Breeding Bird Atlas, with earlier studies, and with future studies to document changes in Michigan’s breeding bird populations;
  • Increase expertise and involvement of Michigan birders in scientific research;
  • Strengthen bonds among organizations in Michigan concerned with birds and their habitats;
  • Educate Michigan citizens about birds and increase public awareness and participation in birding and citizen science programs.

Abundance data collected: Yes

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Those surveying a block are asked to record the number of breeding pairs of each species observed in the block during their field survey. The request does not require a count of every pair of birds in the block, but rather to keep track of the number of pairs or pair equivalents of those seen or heard. Pair equivalents are described as follows:

  • A singing male counts as one, as does a family group or a pair;
  • A female could count as one if she is outside the territory of any known males;
  • Multiple fledged young that are independent would not be counted because they could have emigrated from another block;
  • An adult feeding dependent young would count as one.

Point counts are used for estimating abundance (see description from MBBAII handbook below). A minimum of 25 point counts are to be conducted in as many of the priority and specialty blocks as possible. In addition, five of the 25 point counts in a block are to be done off road and well into the habitat represented. Selection of the off-road sites is the responsibility of the surveyor. These points should be distributed as evenly throughout the block as conditions permit. There is a fairly complex method of selection, which is basically up to the atlasser. In essence, the points are picked by figuring out how many points are found in the square, dividing by 20 to determine the number (x) of road-side counts to exclude. With this determined, start on one side of the square and use every xth point until a total of 20 points have been picked.

For off-road points, atlasser are to select points within representative habitats, about 100 metres from the road-side.

Abundance form: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mbba_handbook_119710_7.pdf

Taken directly from MBBAII handbook: Conducting the Point Counts

1. The standard method for sampling birds is an unlimited-radius, 10-minute point count. All birds seen or heard from a specific point are recorded during a 10-minute period by a qualified observer. Try to turn in different directions during the count, but do not move from the point.

2. A standard form with map should be used to record data. This form requires the observer to estimate where each bird was first encountered (<50 m, 50-100 m, >100 m) and when each bird was first encountered (during the first 3 minutes, next 2 minutes, or last 5 minutes of the census period). These details facilitate comparisons with other studies. If a bird is observed in more than one distance category, count it only in the closest category. Make your best estimate of distance. Record all birds observed, even if they are outside the circle, except if you observe the same bird from more than one point. In that case, record it only once.

3. Birds flying over and not actively using the count area should be recorded separately as “flyovers.” Forest raptors, swallows, and other species which are or appear to be hunting over the count area should be included with the main list of species (i.e., they should not be recorded as flyovers).

4. Whenever possible, sex and age (adult vs. juvenile) of each bird should be recorded. In particular, juvenile birds (e.g., recent fledglings) should be distinguished from adults in order to estimate the number of breeding pairs in the area. Count all birds, regardless of age.

5. When determining the number of birds in a large flock, start by estimating and then count more carefully after your 10-minute count period is done.

6. Time of day, weather conditions, and exact locality in latitude/longitude or UTM coordinates (preferably determined from a global positioning system, or GPS) should be recorded for each count locality. Choose the time of day for your counts based on local conditions. For example, avoid high traffic periods. Counts should be done in the five hours following dawn, and between June 1 and July 10. Habitat should be recorded based on the list in Appendix 2.

Available Reference: Brewer, R., G.A. McPeek and R.J. Adams, Jr. 1991. The Atlas of Breeding Birds of Michigan. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press.

MISSISSIPPI

First Atlas: 1997-2004
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations: National Audubon Society chapters and the Mississippi Ornithological Society.
Project Web site: http://130.18.140.19/atlas/

Contact:

Summary of goals:

  • Originally, the goal had been to survey blocks, run half-mile routes, survey surrounding areas, record nests, and conduct two winter census;
  • By 2001, the study was narrowed to surveying blocks for breeding species and recording nesting sites within the blocks.

Abundance data collected: No

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Not applicable.

MISSOURI

First Atlas: 1986-1992
Second Atlas:
n/a
Sponsoring Organisations: Missouri Department of Conservation; Audubon Society of Missouri; and United States Forest Service.
Project Web site: http://mdc.mo.gov/nathis/birds/birdatlas/

Contact:

  • Brad Jacobs
    PO Box 180
    Jefferson City, MO  65102
    (573) 751-4115  Ext.3648

Summary of goals:

  • The primary goal was to develop a distributional map for each species that depicts as accurately as possible its true breeding range in the state;
  • The resultant information was intended to:
    • Provide baseline data against which future changes in the status and distribution of Missouri's breeding birds could be measured;
    • Determine the location of rare species;
    • Identify significant habitats;
    • Develop a factual database to assist environmental planners in making wise decisions about resource use in Missouri.

Abundance data collected: Yes

Summary of abundance data collection methodology: Species relative abundance maps were generated using data obtained during the years of the Atlas Project from 37 Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) routes established throughout Missouri. Additionally, 60 Miniroute surveys were established specifically for the Atlas Project. Methodology for Miniroute surveys was similar to the BBS except:

  • They were run twice during the breeding season;
  • They included only data collected after sunrise;
  • They consisted of 15 rather than 50 observation stops.

Miniroutes were necessarily shorter because they fit entirely within a Breeding Bird Atlas block. This allowed sightings along the route to be recorded on the Atlas field card. However, because Miniroutes were run twice, a total of 30, three-minute observations provided data for each Miniroute. The two runs were about a week apart, with stops sampled in reverse on the second run. The one-week interval enabled surveyors to consider whether individuals sighted on the second run could be coded as "territorial" on the Atlas field card. Miniroute and BBS data from 1986-92 were converted to birds per stop, then combined and multiplied by 100. This created the unit measure used for the relative abundance maps included in the species accounts; where inadequate abundance data were obtained, the abundance map has been omitted.

Available Reference: Jacobs, B., J. D. Wilson.  1997. Missouri breeding bird atlas, 1986-1992. Missouri Dep. Cons., Nat. Hist. Ser. no. 6.

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